Colorado Symphony Recordings

Your Colorado Symphony is proud to present recordings below for download on iTunes or Amazon! Select works also available at the Colorado Symphony Guild Shop inside Gallery 1 in Boettcher Concert Hall inside the Denver Performing Arts Complex (open before most concerts!).




Vaughan Williams 
Dona nobis pacemStephen Hough Missa Mirabilis

Colorado Symphony
Andrew Litton, conductor
Colorado Symphony Chorus, Duain Wolfe, director
Sarah Fox, Christopher Maltman, vocals

Dona nobis pacem
 became a somewhat unexpected hit for Vaughan Williams. A fervently anti-war plea, the work remains
to this day one of the composer's most widely performed works. Coupled with it here is the first recording of Stephen Hough's Missa Mirabilis (the title derives from an unfortunate motorway incident), a work which shares with Vaughan Williams an ability to seem very much greater than the sum of its parts. Andrew Litton directs the Colorado Symphony and all-star soloists Sarah Fox and Christopher Maltman.

 




Amos Lee Live At Red Rocks with the Colorado Symphony

When Amos Lee rolled into Red Rocks in August 2014, he had been on tour for almost a year in support of his fifth studio album Mountains of Sorrow, Rivers of Song. But this concert in particular was something special: it was his first headlining date at the legendary venue, and backed by the Colorado Symphony with arrangements composed just for that evening. Lucky for us, the experience was captured. Live at Red Rocks is a 14-track, career-spanning set.

 



Gregory Alan Isakov with the Colorado Symphony

Gregory Alan Isakov’s full-length album Gregory Alan Isakov with the Colorado Symphony was released June 10, 2016, on Suitcase Town Music. A collaboration with the Colorado Symphony, the eleven-track record features songs from Isakov’s previous albums The Weatherman, This Empty Northern Hemisphere, and That Sea, The Gambler, as well as “Liars,” which was written by Ron Scott. 

Recorded at Boettcher Concert Hall in Denver, as well as at Starling Farm in Boulder, Gregory Alan Isakov with The Colorado Symphony was co-produced by Isakov and his longtime collaborator, Jamie Mefford, and was arranged by Tom Hagerman (DeVotchKa) and Jay Clifford (Jump Little Children), and conducted by the Colorado Symphony’s former resident conductor Scott O’Neil. Since his debut with the Colorado Symphony in November 2013, Isakov has gone on to perform with them at Colorado’s legendary Red Rocks Amphitheatre, as well as with the Seattle Symphony and the Oregon Symphony Orchestra.

 




Beethoven 9 performed by the Colorado Symphony

The Colorado Symphony is proud to release a special recording in partnership with Neumann Microphones. Recorded over a thrilling 2014/15 Colorado Symphony Season Opening weekend, this transcription of one of Beethoven's most recognized and beloved works can now be yours to enjoy! This album features a star-studded cast of vocalists with the Colorado Symphony conducted by Andrew Litton, in addition to the world-renowned Colorado Symphony Chorus — which celebrated their 30th anniversary season at the time of the recording. Over 4,000 people were captivated by this tremendous work during the live performance. Now you can experience these moving works in a new, multi-channel recording specially produced by multi-Grammy® Award-winning producer Leslie Ann Jones and by Wolfgang Fraissinet, President of Neumann Microphones. Over sixty-six microphones and a German-made Stagetec Aurus digital mixing console were used to capture the virtuosic depth of this performance in exquisite detail. Every nuance and note have been captured for your listening pleasure.



Béla Fleck Juno Concerto for Banjo and Orchestra


Béla Fleck is the world's premier banjo player, a 16-time Grammy® Award winner nominated in more categories than any other musician, a genre-busting collaborator, a film producer, and a composer. Foremost, though, he is a dad. The impact of fatherhood on Béla is reflected in Juno Concerto, named for his firstborn son with fellow folk musician Abigail Washburn. The album was recorded with the Colorado Symphony, conducted by José Luis Gomez, and also includes two tracks with the Brooklyn Rider string quartet: "Griff" and the second movement of "Quintet for Banjo and Strings," the latter a previously unrecorded collaboration with friend and mentor Edgar Meyer, representing Béla's first experimentation with classical music. The banjo in these movements embodies the voice of doom, interrupting the music with dark, dissonant interjections culminating in a melancholy banjo solo-a contemplative end to the album that reveals Béla's true depth as a composer. Juno Concerto is a reminder that Béla Fleck is among the most innovative and virtuosic musicians of our time.





Copland conducted by Andrew Litton

Having taken up the post of music director with the Colorado Symphony in 2013, Andrew Litton has chosen a highly fitting program for the orchestra's first recording on BIS: the Wild West, its folk music, traditions, and legends loom large in Aaron Copland's ballet scores Billy the Kid and Rodeo. The two works were the result of the composer's search during the early 1930's for a new musical language. Copland himself described his reasons for this as follows: "An entirely new public for music had grown up around the radio and the phonograph. It made no sense to ignore them and to continue writing as if they did not exist. I felt that it was worth the effort to see if I couldn’t say what I had to say in the simplest possible terms." In the two ballets, this new direction can be felt in the immediacy of the music, but also in Copland's use of cowboy tunes. A similar approach, but with Mexican themes, characterizes the slightly earlier El Salón México, inspired by a visit to a dance hall in Mexico and the atmosphere he experienced there. Whereas these three works are among the most popular in Copland's entire production, the opening piece, An Outdoor Overture, is something of a rarity, especially on disc. Composed in the same year as Billy the Kid, the overture was part of an educational campaign with the slogan "American Music for American Youth" and its snappy rhythms and colorful orchestration will have made it as successful in its original purpose as it is here, as a curtain raiser. The Colorado Symphony is obviously enjoying itself in this all-American program, as is its conductor Andrew Litton, who joins the revelry as honky-tonk pianist in the Celebration section of Billy the Kid and the Ranch House Party in Rodeo, before bringing the disc to a rollicking end in that ballets closing section, Hoe-Down.